‘The Big Lebowski’ Is Coming Back To Theaters For Its 20th Anniversary

Good news for all you Dudes out there: “The Big Lebowski” is going to return to theaters for a special anniversary event, so you can see the Coen brothers classic on the big screen again.

The 1998 cult comedy classic is many people’s favorite movie of all time, with actors like Jennifer Lawrence, Nick Offerman, Jonah Hill, Seth Rogen and Jane Lynch calling it their favorite film. And, now, in honor of its 20th anniversary, the flick is getting a chance to return to the theaters.

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Getty, Mike Coppola

For just two days, Aug. 5 and Aug. 8, “The Big Lebowski” will be playing at select theaters across the country. The return is hosted by Fathom Events, you can find locations and buy tickets on their web site. (No word yet on whether the Dude’s favorite drink, the white Russian, will be provided, though.)

Although “The Big Lebowski” is now one of the most popular movies of all time, when it first came out in 1998, the movie wasn’t a hit.

In fact, numerous critics were either negative or ambivalent about the film, with Roger Ebert himself saying the movie “rushes in all directions and never ends up anywhere.”

GettyImages-952595858 ‘The Big Lebowski’ Is Coming Back To Theaters For Its 20th Anniversary
Getty, Emma McIntyre

However, star Jeff Bridges said this “sleeper hit” quality of “The Big Lebowski” might be part of the reason why it is so beloved today.

“I think there’s a real joy in going to see movies when you discover them yourself,” he told Rolling Stone. “If somebody hasn’t seen The Big Lebowski, you say, ‘Oh great, you’ve got something great in store for you.’ It’s something that gives joy to the person who’s turning them on to the movie, joy for the people who’re seeing it. Maybe that’s it — something that you kind of share.”

Now, the film has achieved such important status in our culture that it was one of just 700 movies that the Library of Congress chose to include in their National Film Registry, meaning that they consider “The Big Lebowski” to be “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and important enough to carefully preserve for future generations.

It turns out the Dude really does abide.